Images of U.S. troops in World War I

Pershing standing w injured soldier
General John J. Pershing visits with a wounded soldier in France. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Burying Americans
More than 50,000 Americans were killed and 206,000 wounded in the decisive WWI battle of the Meuse-Argonne. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Rickenbacker with plane
WWI American ace Eddie Rickenbacker. With 26 aerial victories, he was America’s most successful fighter ace in the war. He was also considered to have won the most awards for valor by an American during the war. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Meuse Argonne soldiers on wet road
The 47-day Battle of the Meuse-Argonne involved more than 1.2- million U.S. troops who fought German forces in France and helped force a German surrender on November 11, 1918. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Pershing WS US troops
When the fighting ended in WWI, General Pershing commanded more than 2 million American troops who were fighting on European soil. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Meuse Argonne soldiers reading mail and newspapers
U.S. troops line up to collect their mail and read newspapers in France during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Motorcycle US soldiers
A U.S. Army motorcycle messenger in France in 1918. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
HEC/36700/36794a.tif
General John J. Pershing was the commander of the American Expeditionary Forces who joined fighting in WWI in 1917. Photo: Library of Congress
PERSHING ARGONNE
General John J. Pershing during a visit to the front lines in France during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Pershing pins medal on US soldier
General John J. Pershing pins a battle medal on an American soldier during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Soldiers carry wounded through town
U.S. troops carry a wounded soldier through a battle-scarred French town during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
US soldier with mortar shell
Millions of artillery and mortar shells were fired and claimed hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians on both sides of the fighting in WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
US soldiers tank portrait
U.S. Army Signal Corps cameramen ride a tank in France in WWI. Signal Corps members risked their lives shooting film and photos during the war. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Medical soldiers portrait
Medical Corps members in France during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
US troops portrait captured town
American troops pose for a photo after capturing a French city from enemy German forces in WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
1 Breaking Point evening_world_aug_1_1914
World War I, also called the Great War, broke out in 1914 between the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary, and the original Allied forces of France, Russia and the United Kingdom. More than 70 million troops fought in the war.
Soldiers portrait in the field
U.S. soldiers during WWI combat operations along the Western Front in France in 1918. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
US Troops in recaptured French town
U.S. troops march into a recaptured French town during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Soldiers artillery portrait
Members of a U.S. Army artillery battalion in France during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Combat US soldiers in field
Many of the American troops who fought in the Battle of the Meuse-Argonne faced harsh weather conditions and German defensive positions that caused heavy casualties in the opening weeks of the 47-day battle. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
War loot US soldiers
American soldiers with captured war loot in France during WWI. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Wounded US troops good photo
Wounded U.S. troops await transport to a field hospital during fighting in France in WWI. An estimated 323,000 Americans were killed or wounded in the war. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
WWI Soldiers NARA getting smokes
U.S. soldiers line up for free cigarettes in France during WWI. Tobacco’s association with the United States military started in World War I when tobacco companies began to target military personnel through the distribution of cigarettes to servicemen and the eventual inclusion of cigarettes into their rations. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
Writing letters US soldiers home
American soldiers write home during a lull in combat during WWI in France. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration
US nurses and soldiers portrait
U.S. nurses and soldiers pose for a photo at a field hospital in France in 1918. Photo: National Archives and Records Administration

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